Senior explores the cutting edge of medical advancement

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Senior explores the cutting edge of medical advancement

Anna Sekerak and other scholars discuss classroom topics.

Anna Sekerak and other scholars discuss classroom topics.

Anna Sekerak and other scholars discuss classroom topics.

Anna Sekerak and other scholars discuss classroom topics.

Josie Morss, Editor-in-Chief

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Volleyball, Ping-Pong, board games, and Uno: these are some of the ways this year’s Yale Young Global Scholars pass the time, according to senior and fellow Scholar, Anna Sekerak.

Students who took part in YGGS needed the occasional Uno break from the intensive two-week pre-college program. The summer camp for high achieving students offers classes in STEM to art. Every course is packed with insightful lectures, intimate break out sessions, and interesting seminars. The highly researched Capstone project explores specific interests, like public health and epidemiology. The collaborative assignment differed from group to group. 

Sekerak spent her time studying Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS). While class was in session, she absorbed lectures. Her favorites were about music. 

“We listened to different sounds that organs make, and then he taught that to nursing students in order to figure out what’s wrong with people,” Sekerak said.

In 2013, there were 310 YYGS participants. In 2020, they expect to have 2,500. Simply by attending, Sekerak has added another ripple among the massive wave of student interest. 

“It’s good to be part of a new way, and I’m very grateful that they gave me the opportunity to learn there,” she said.

Living and learning like a college student made Sekerak determined to attend a university with a similar atmosphere to Yale, or Yale itself. Campus diversity is particularly important to her. 

“I was looking for diversity, and I think with diversity, there was inclusion,” Sekerak said. 

Sekerak hopes that the exploration she’s doing now will help to secure her dream career, an epidemiologist at the World Health Organization in Switzerland. As an epidemiologist, she would be responsible for managing disease outbreaks and discovering possible cures. 

YYGS offered more than the average summer camp. It was a resource that welcomed new perspectives, thoughts, and outlooks on life. Most importantly, Sekerak gained self assurance about what the future holds. 

“I know I’m gonna be okay. I’m gonna be okay wherever I go,” said Sekerak.

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